Projects: Expanding Access to Postsecondary Education

There is a strong evidence base that postsecondary education can end the cycle of incarceration for those in our nation's prisons.

EAPSE Image Vera’s Expanding Access to Postsecondary Education Project aims to increase the participation of incarcerated individuals in high-quality postsecondary education programs during and after prison through the provision of expert information and technical assistance to state departments of corrections, colleges and universities, and state and local policymakers. Technical assistance will be provided to the Second Chance Pell sites through support by Grant No. 2014-DP-BX-K006 awarded by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance.

FIND A SECOND CHANCE PELL PROGRAM NEAR YOU

Explore map produced by the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics to view the institutions that were selected and the correctional institutions they serve.

NEW FACT SHEET ON EFFECTIVE COLLEGE AND CORRECTIONS PARTNERSHIPS FOR POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION IN PRISONS
Fact SheetThe release of the Building Effective Partnerships for High-Quality Postsecondary Education in Correctional Facilities fact sheet coincides with the completion of the first phase of review for institutions seeking to participate in the U.S. Department of Education’s Second Chance Pell – Pell for Incarcerated Students Experiment. Postsecondary educational institutions that have successfully passed the first phase review have until March 20, 2016 to provide thorough responses  to the information collection instrument. Preparing those responses will require thoughtful planning, communication and collaboration with the intended correctional partners. To support the development and implementation of new partnerships and strengthening of existing ones between colleges and corrections agencies, this fact sheet shares lessons learned from Vera’s Unlocking Potential: Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education multi-state demonstration project, launched in 2012, involving 15 colleges and universities in partnership with 14 prisons. The lessons in this fact sheet are grouped into three broad areas: developing college-corrections partnerships, ensuring quality in postsecondary education programs, and supporting education post-release.
View Fact Sheet »
REQUEST TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
The Expanding Access to Postsecondary Education Project provides technical assistance, training and information resources to state departments of corrections, and state and local policymakers to support the delivery of high-quality postsecondary education programs in prisons and to develop policies, procedures, and practices to increase access to such programs.
Request Technical Assistance »

Recent research suggests that access to postsecondary education in prison can significantly reduce an individual’s odds of re-offending and returning to prison, increase the likelihood of employment, and that every $1 spent on education in prison yields a $5 return on investment.  Additionally, postsecondary education is not only transformative for the participating students but also strengthens families and communities, particularly communities disproportionately impacted by crime and incarceration.

Nonetheless, the delivery of high-quality in-prison college programs is extremely challenging to achieve. Implementation demands extensive upfront and ongoing planning, coordination and communication involving corrections and college administrators, faculty and staff.

This Knowledge Bank webpage provides the latest news and research on postsecondary education for justice-involved students, current thinking from leaders in the field, and opportunities for trainings.

Recent Highlights

In the News

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch Delivers Remarks at Goucher College's Prison Education Partnership at the Maryland Correctional Institute
The U.S. Department of Justice

For Prisoners, a Path to Society
The New York Times
 

Blog 

Pell grants offer pathways to success for people in prison
By Fred Patrick

Viewing Prison Education as a Smart Investment
By Doris Buffett

"Postsecondary education programs give incarcerated people the education, confidence, and skills they need in order to return to their community ready to contribute, not recidivate. I have seen firsthand the positive impact that the Pathways from Prison Project has on students and the prison environment and I strongly encourage other jurisdictions to provide their own incarcerated populations with the opportunity to learn and grow.”

—David Guice 
Commissioner of the North Carolina Division of Adult Correction and Juvenile Justice

Why Offer College Courses in Prison?

College in prison is transformative, cost-effective, increases public safety, and addresses workforce needs increasingly requiring some form of postsecondary education or training. In 2013, RAND found that the odds of recidivating were 43 percent lower for prisoners who participated in education in prison, compared to those who did not. RAND also found a three-year return on investment of nearly 400 percent, or $5 saved for every $1 spent. The odds of securing employment post-release were 13 percent higher among those who participated in education programming.

To learn more about the positive affects of prison education, visit Vera's Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education project.


This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided.

 

Voices from the Field

The Unlocking Potential: Perspectives on Education in Prison blog series—as part of Vera’s Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education Project—explores postsecondary education in prison and its benefits—during and after incarceration—through the unique experiences and insight of former students, educators, nonprofit leaders, corrections officials, reentry experts, and more.


Changing the way we think about prison education

By Jeremy Travis and Monnero Guervil, May 31, 2016

Jeremy TravisInterview with Jeremy Travis, President, John Jay College of Criminal Justice.
LEARN MORE »

 

 


 

Producing active, informed, and engaged citizens

By Todd Clear and Rana Campbell, April 4, 2016

Todd ClearInterview with Todd Clear, Distinguished Professor of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University.
LEARN MORE »

 

 


 

Supporting students post-release

By Michael Carey and Rana Campbell, Dec 4, 2015

Michael CareyInterview with Michael Carey. Michael Carey is the director of College Initiative (CI), a New York-based organization that helps formerly incarcerated and court-involved men and women enroll and succeed in college.
LEARN MORE »

 


 

Viewing prison education as a smart investment

By Doris Buffet, April 14, 2015

Interview with Doris Buffett, founder of The Sunshine Lady Foundation, one of the Pathways Project’s main funders. The foundation’s mission is to invest in organizations and programs that provide opportunities for the advancement of education, well-being, and new life choices for disadvantaged people. LEARN MORE »

 


 

Getting on the same page for prison education

By Heather Gay, January 14, 2015

Interview with Heather Gay. Heather Gay is the manager of education for the Michigan Department of Corrections (MDOC) and the state’s Pathways Project director.
LEARN MORE »

 


 

Employers must understand their role in post-incarceration success

By Yariela Kerr-Donovan, November 19, 2014

Interview with Yariela Kerr-Donovan, a member of Vera’s Pathways Project national advisory board and human resources director of Strategic Workforce Planning & Development (Project REACH/Community Education Program) for The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System.
LEARN MORE »

 


 

The challenges and rewards of teaching in prison

By Todd Butler, September 29, 2014

Interview with Todd Butler, Dean of Arts and Sciences at Jackson College, which provides in-prison college education to the two Pathways Project prisons in Michigan as well as an ambitious program of instruction to additional inmates in a self-pay program.
LEARN MORE »

 


 

Using education to help others succeed

By Stanley Richards, August 26, 2014

Interview with Stanley Richards. Stanley Richards is a formerly incarcerated individual who served time in New York state prisons and currently serves as the senior vice president at The Fortune Society, a New York City-based nonprofit organization that aims to support successful reentry after prison and promote alternatives to incarceration. LEARN MORE »

 


 

Lessons from San Quentin

By Jody Lewen, August 18, 2014

Interview with Jody Lewen, Executive Director of the Prison University Project, a nonprofit organization that operates the College Program at California’s San Quentin State Prison.
LEARN MORE »

 


 

Using Media to Shift Perspectives

By Scott Budnick, July 28, 2014

Interview with Scott Budnick, founder of The Anti-Recidivism Coalition, an organization dedicated to reducing incarceration, improving the outcomes of formerly incarcerated individuals, and building healthier communities.
LEARN MORE »

 


 

Building Leaders Through Education

By Glenn Martin, July 2, 2014

Interview with Glenn E. Martin. Glenn E. Martin is a national leader and criminal justice reform advocate who served six years in New York state prisons. He is the founder of JustLeadershipUSA, a national advocacy organization that aims to reduce crime and cut the number of people in prison in half by 2030. LEARN MORE »

 


 

From Prison to Cambridge

By Walter Fortson, June 9, 2014

Interview with Walter Fortson. Walter Fortson is currently a masters of philosophy candidate in criminology at the University of Cambridge. Upon his release in 2010 after spending more than two years in prison, he attended Rutgers University through the Mountainview Program, which helps formerly incarcerated people go to college. LEARN MORE »

 
 

This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided.

 

Knowledge Bank

Explore our resource collection of policy briefs, white papers, research from the field, toolkits, and other publications on issues related to postsecondary education programs in prisons, such as college access, student success, and reentry.


U.S. Department of Education. Beyond the Box: Increasing Access to Higher Education for Justice-Involved Individuals. Washington D.C., 2016

The Beyond the Box Resource Guide provides information for colleges and universities to help remove barriers that can prevent the estimated 70 million citizens with criminal records from pursuing higher education, including considering the chilling effect of inquiring early in the application process whether prospective students have ever been arrested. The guide also encourages alternatives to inquiring about criminal histories during college admissions and provides recommendations to support a holistic review of applicants.

 


 

Zinshteyn, M. “Earning a college degree means having skills other workers don’t have: But American adults still lag behind those of other wealthy nations” The Hechinger Report, March 10, 2016

A new federal study, titled the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies, or PIAAC compares the numerical and literacy skills of workers in more than 20 countries. The results of this study describe of the relationship between numeracy and literacy skills, U.S. worker’s age and their level of education.

 


 

Bozick, R., Davis, L., Tolbert, M. “Evaluation of the Pathways from Prison to Post-Secondary Education Project: Results of the Implementation Study” RAND Corporation, Safety and Justice Program, 2015

The “Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education Demonstration Project” is a comprehensive, integrated approach to postsecondary education for currently or formerly incarcerated individuals. This project intends to prepare people to transition back to their communities and complete a college degree. Increase postsecondary education attainment, which increases employment and earnings; break cycle of intergenerational poverty. Reduce recidivism and improve quality of life in neighborhoods disproportionately impacted by crime and incarceration. Build an evidence-based case that creates momentum for systems change.

 


 

RTI International, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education. “Reentry Education Tool Kit”. Washington, D.C., 2016

The Reentry Education Toolkit was created by RTI International with support from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE), to help education providers and their partners create a reentry education continuum in their communities. The toolkit offers guidelines, tools, and resources to help education providers implement the Reentry Education Framework. The Framework promotes the development of an education continuum spanning facility – and community – based reentry education programs. It has five critical components – program infrastructure, strategic partnerships, education services, transition processes, and sustainability.

 


 

Johnstone, R. “Guided Pathways Demystified: Exploring Ten Commonly Asked Questions about Implementing Pathways”. National Center for Inquiry and Improvement, 2015

This white paper from the National Center for Inquiry and Improvement discusses the guided pathways to success movement. This movement is designed to allow the completion agenda, a pledge to increase student completion rates by 50% over a 10 year period.  The paper explores the ten most commonly asked questions about guided Pathways that have arisen over the past 5 years.

 


 

Trostel, P. “It’s Not Just the Money: The Benefits of College Education to Individuals and Society”. University of Maine Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center and School of Economics, 2015

This report highlights many of the unmeasured and ignored benefits that college attendance brings, gathering information and evidence from several different literatures. Notable benefits include increased volunteering, lower commitments of crime, and greater community involvement.

 


 

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education. Second Chance Pell Instrument. Washington, D.C., 2015

This document is an information collection instrument for applicants to the Second Chance Pell Pilot Program. It lists the information and considerations that institutions of higher education and correctional agencies will need to take into acount in order to be selected for participation. This information will be used by the Department of Education in selecting a diverse set of qualified institutions for participation in the experiment.  Categories for collection include program, penal, and student information. 

 


 

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education. Applications for New Awards; Juvenile Justice Reentry Education Program: Opening Doors to College and Careers Through Career and Technical Education, Washington, D.C., 2015

In this notice, the Department of Education is inviting applications for the Juvenile Justice Reentry Education Program. The purpose of this program is to improve outcomes for justice-involved youth through career and technical education (CTE) programs, reentry services, and employment training opportunities.

 


 

Schneider, M. “The Value of Sub-baccalaureate Credentials.” Issues in Science and Technology, Volume 31, Issue 4, (2015)

This journal article examines postsecondary credentials, included degrees and certificates, and attempts to determine the value of these credentials as well as the potential earnings.  The author argues that access to data will help students and policymakers make informed strategic educational decisions.

 


 

Jobs For The Future. Supporting Second Chances: Education and Employment Strategies for People Returning from Correctional Facilities, Boston, MA. 2015.

This brief highlights strategies for increasing education and employment pathways for youth and adults involved in the criminal justice system. Specific policies and priorities to help the transition for formerly incarcerated individuals are also included. 

 


 

The Aspen Institute, Workforce Strategies Initiative. A Snapshot of Courses to Employment Partnerships: Results from a National Survey of Nonprofit Community College Collaborations, Washington, D.C. 2015

This report from Workforce Strategies Initiative at the Aspen Institute is on findings from a 2013 survey of partnerships between workforce nonprofit organizations and community colleges that support student success in specific industries. The report describes strategies utilized by these Courses to Employment (C2E) partnerships, including employer engagement, educational and support services, funding, and collaboration, as well as highlights challenges and opportunities that were identified by survey respondents.

 


 

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education. Notice Inviting Postsecondary Educational Institutions to Participate in Experiments under the Experimental Sites Initiative; Federal Student Financial Assistance Programs under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as Amended, Washington, D.C., 2015

In this notice, the Secretary of the Department of Education invites postsecondary educational institutions (institutions) that participate in the student financial assistance programs authorized under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (the HEA), to apply to participate in a new institution-based experiment under the Experimental Sites Initiative (ESI). Under the ESI, the Secretary has authority to grant waivers from certain title IV HEA statutory or regulatory requirements to allow a limited number of institutions to participate in experiments to test alternative methods for administering the title IV HEA programs. The alternative methods of title IV HEA administration that the Secretary is permitting under the ESI are designed to facilitate efforts by institutions to test certain innovative practices aimed at improving student outcomes and the delivery of services. Under this experiment, participating institutions will provide Federal Pell Grant funding to otherwise eligible students who are incarcerated in Federal or State penal institutions.

 


 

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education. Educational Technology in Corrections, Washington, D.C., 2015

A new report by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) examines the current use of advanced technologies in corrections. The report is designed to aid federal, state, and local corrections staff and correctional education administrators as they explore ways to use advanced technologies in corrections securely and cost-effectively. It describes the present status of these technologies in corrections; existing and emerging approaches to offering such services in facilities; and the successes and challenges of early implementers. The report concludes with recommendations for adopting educational technology in corrections.

 


 

 

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This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided.

 

In the News

Recent coverage of current issues, programs, initiatives, and commentary related to postsecondary education in corrections and reentry as captured in national, state, and local media.


Wall Street Journal, “College Classes Get a Boost at New York State Prisons”

 

June 14, 2016

This article highlights how the allocation of $7.5 million in bank forfeiture funds, by the Manhattan district attorney’s office, will be used to expand prison education programs in New York state prison system.

 

 


 

Nj.com, “How N.J. man went from prison incarceration to college graduation”

June 12, 2016

This article highlights the story of Ean Polke who recently graduated from Rutgers University, which is part of the Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education project.  

 


 

The Atlantic, “Giving Students a Second Chance”

June 10, 2016

The ‘Take the Fair Change Pledge’ is a recent initiative announced by the White House that calls on businesses and higher education institutions to eliminate unnecessary barriers that prevent individuals with criminal records to be employed or gain admissions into a postsecondary educational institution.

 


 

New York Times, "The Smart Way to Help Ex-Convicts, and Society"

June 3, 2016

In this Opinion Editorial by Robert E. Rubin, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, highlights the needs of currently and formerly incarcerated people in order to reduce recidivism, equip them with the skills to join the workforce and prepare them for a successful transition from incarceration into society.  

 


 

 

m live, "This brotherhood we have is the right thing,' says prison inmate in group of college"

May 20, 2016

This article and accompanying video clip highlight the recent graduation of Jackson College incarcerated students who are part of Vera Institute of Justice Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education Project

 

 


 

Arkansas Online, "Arkansas Lawmaker wants $1 Million to Pay for Inmates' College Courses"

April 26, 2016

In an effort to reduce the high rates of recidivism, the highest in the nation, Arkansas state senator Linda Chesterfield, D-Little Rock introduced legislation that seeks to budget $1 million to enroll state prisoners in higher education programs. The proposed $1 million would be an addition to existing higher education programs within Arkansas state prison system.   

 


 

 

New York Times, "A College Education for Prisoners"

February 16, 2016

This article highlights the most effective way to keep people from returning to prison is to give them the necessary job skills that make them marketable employees upon release. This would require the federal government to reinstate funding for prison education programs that became obsolete in the 1990’s. Last year President Obama initiated a test pilot program that will reinstate Pell grant funding to a limited number of federal and state corrections who are collaborating with a postsecondary institution.

 


 

Washington Square News, “Exclusive: Silver Master’s APP Does Away With Criminal Conviction Box”

January 27, 2016

The Silver School of Social Work at NYU will no longer require applicants to their Master’s program to disclose prior criminal convictions. This decision made through a faculty vote in spring 2015. This change in policy follows a recent law passed by New York City officials, the Fair Chance Act – which makes it against the law for employers to ask applicants about their criminal history until the end of the interview process.

 


 

New York Times, “Cuomo Proposes Higher-Education Initiative in New York Prisons”

January 10, 2016

The governor of New York, Andrew M. Cuomo has reintroduced his plan to provide access to post-secondary to incarcerated people in New York’s state prison system. He previously introduced a similar bill two years ago, but did not gain traction after his plan was criticized by  oppositional leaders. What’s different with this plan is that it will be entirely funded with forfeiture funds from the Manhattan district attorney’s office. In addition matching funds will come from private donors.


 

The Washington Post, “Group urges Nebraska prisons to improve education programs”

December 3, 2015

This article highlights a recent report by the Lincoln-based Nebraska Appleseed. The report recommends that Nebraska’s lawmakers improve their prison education programs to better prepare inmates for release and reduce recidivism.

MORE NEWS

 
 

This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided.

 

Funding Notices, Training, and Events

Find opportunities for training sessions, conferences, webinars, and other convenings focused on postsecondary education in corrections and reentry on this page.  Check back often for upcoming events. 


EVENT

ACA’s 146th Congress of Correction

Date: On or before May 17th, 2016

Agency/Organization: American Correctional Association

Information: The American Correctional Association is hosting their 146th Congress of Correction. Fred Patrick, Director for the Center on Sentencing and Corrections at the Vera Institute of Justice, will be facilitating a workshop that will bring together education and correction professionals to discuss the essential components of implementing a postsecondary correctional program that begins with students in a state or federal correctional facility and follows these students out into the community to continue their education. This workshop will also provide a high level overview of the prisons participating in the Second Chance Pell Pilot Program.

Conference dates: August 5-10, 2016. Boston, Massachusetts

 


 

EVENT

Criminal Justice Investment Initiative & Request for Proposals College-in-Prison Reentry Initiative

Date: February 12th, 2016

Agency/Organization: District Attorney of New York County and City University of New York Institute for State & Local Governance

Information: On February 12th, 2016 the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office, in collaboration with City University of New York Institute for State & Local Governance, issued a Request for Proposal (RFP). The RFP is part of the DA’s commitment to invest $250 million seized in international financial crime prosecutions through its Criminal Justice Investment Initiative (CJII). CJII will invest criminal asset forfeiture funds into transformative projects that seek to improve public safety, prevent crime, and promote a fair and efficient justice system. CUNY Institute for State & Local Governance manages CJII on behalf of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. As part of CJII, ISLG is seeking proposals from educational institutions to provide college-level classes in prisons operated by the New York Department of Corrections and Community Supervisions (DOCCS).

The deadline to submit questions about this RFP has been extended. Additional questions not addressed in the addendum must be submitted to cipp@rfcuny.org by February 26, 2016.

Final proposals are due by March 31, 2016.


 

EVENT

Call for Public Comment

Date: On or before November 13, 2015

Agency/Organization: The U.S. Department of Education

Information The U.S. Department of Education has called for public comments regarding the information they are planning to collect from institutions of higher education interested in being selected for the Second Chance Pell Pilot Program. The Department of Education is especially interested in public comment addressing the following issues: (1) Is this collection necessary to the proper functions of the Department; (2) will this information be processed and used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) how might the Department enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (5) how might the Department minimize the burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology.

Comments are due on or before November 13, 2015.   


 

EVENT

Notice of RFP to fund college opportunities for current and formerly incarcerated students in California

Date: On or around November 2, 2015

Agency/Organization: The Opportunity Institute, Stanford Criminal Justice Center, and the Vera Institute of Justice

Information: On approximately November 2, 2015, The Opportunity Institute, in partnership with the Stanford Criminal Justice Center and the Vera Institute of Justice, intends to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) as part of the Renewing Communities Initiative in California. The RFP will fund innovative programs that increase college opportunities and successes for formerly and currently incarcerated Californians. Funded programs can be primarily on a college campus supporting formerly incarcerated students, primarily in a local jail, primarily in a state prison, or working both inside and outside, but all applications must demonstrate on-ramps and links from corrections to education. It is expected that funding will be made available to pilot programs for three years, with one-year renewable contracts. More information will be forthcoming.

 


 

EVENT

Webinar for Experimental Sites Initiative’s “Second Chance Pell: Pell for Students Who are Incarcerated”

Date: Thursday September 17, 2015, 1:30-3:00 PM EST

Website: https://experimentalsites.ed.gov/exp/training.html

Agency/Organization: U.S. Department of Education

Information: This webinar provides an overview of the Second Chance Pell Pilot Program. Discussions include regulations, institutional reporting requirements, and other features of the program. The primary audience is higher education institutions, but correctional agency and facility staff are encouraged to attend. The webinar was held on the 17th of September, but a recording, transcript, and slides are available at the link above.

 


 

EVENT

Fifth Annual National Conference on Higher Education in Prison

Date: November 6, 2015 to November 8, 2015

Location: Oakland Campus of the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Website: http://nchep2015.com/

Agency/Organization: University of Pittsburgh

Information: This conference seeks to spark education justice efforts throughout the Allegheny region in PA, while also working toward a national organization for the study and work of education in prison. The immediate region is home to well over twenty colleges and Universities, as well as a number of additional community and two-year colleges–the conference will be in immediate reach of students and faculty.

 


 

EVENT

Notice Inviting Postsecondary Educational Institutions to Participate in Experiments under the Experimental Sites Initiative

Date: Closing date is October 2, 2015, although institutions submitting letters that are received after October 2, 2015 may still, at the discretion of the Secretary, be considered for participation

Website: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/08/03/2015-18994/inviting-postsecondary-educational-institutions-to-participate-in-experiments-experimental-sites

Agency/Organization: U.S. Department of Education

Information: In this notice, the Secretary of the Department of Education invites postsecondary educational institutions (institutions) that participate in the student financial assistance programs authorized under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (the HEA), to apply to participate in a new institution-based experiment under the Experimental Sites Initiative (ESI). Under this experiment, participating institutions will provide Federal Pell Grant funding to otherwise eligible students who are incarcerated in Federal or State penal institutions.

 


 

EVENT

70th Annual International Correctional Education Association Conference

Date: July 12, 2015 to July 15, 2015

Location: Arlington, Virginia, Hyatt Regency Crystal City

Website: http://www.ceanational.org/70th%20conference.htm

Agency/Organization: Correctional Educational Associaton

Information: This conference is put on annually by the Correctional Educational Association.  The focus of this year's event was technology in correctional education.

 


 

EVENT

Cornell Prison Education Program - Short Film, Discussion, and Refreshments

Date:  June 10, 2015 from 7:00 PM to 9:30 PM

Location: New York City (address provided to confirmed attendees)
Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cornell-prison-education-program-short-film-discussion-and-refreshments-tickets-16825321991

Agency/Organization: Cornell Prison Education Program

Information: Cornell University’s Prison Education Program stands out for its engagement of undergraduate students who serve as Teaching Assistants (TAs) within the program. This year the program has produced a short film about these TAs and the impact that the Cornell Prison Education Program is having on education not only in prison, but also for students on campus.

 
 

This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided.

 

Technical Assistance

The Expanding Access to Postsecondary Education Project provides targeted technical assistance and information resources to state departments of corrections, legislators, postsecondary education institutions, and other agencies interested in implementing and/or increasing access to high-quality postsecondary education programs in correctional facilities or reentry settings.  This assistance may include: implementation assistance, policy memoranda on specific issue areas, facilitation of local partnerships, and/or referrals to experts in the field.

Request Technical Assistance »


 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided.

 

Other Resources

Other resources for state and local departments of corrections, legislators, postsecondary education institutions, and other agencies interested in implementing and/or increasing access to high-quality postsecondary education programs in correctional facilities or reentry settings.


The National Reentry Resource Center (NRRC) provides education, training, and technical assistance to states, localities, non-profit organizations, service providers such as educational institutions, and departments of correction working on prisoner reentry. The NRRC includes publications, webinars, and a network of practitioners, researchers, and policymakers focusing on reentry issues.

 


 

The Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) administers and coordinates programs related to adult education and literacy, career and technical education, and community colleges. The Office of Correctional Education, responsible for providing technical assistance to and sharing information with states, educational institutions, and correctional institutions, is also part of OCTAE.

 


 

The RAND Corporation operates a website focusing on correctional education, including postsecondary correctional education. This website includes publications, policy research, and a list of correctional education projects RAND is currently evaluating.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

This Web site is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided.

 

Fred Patrick
Fred Patrick
Director, Center on Sentencing and Corrections
 

 

 

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