Strengthening Families and Communities

Expanding Access to Health Care

Health problems—from diabetes, to hepatitis C, to drug abuse and mental illness—are much more common among people involved in the criminal justice system. Limited access to health care in their communities is too often the reason they end up in a police car or jail cell. And when the system doesn’t open a door to treatment, their health further deteriorates.

Applying a public health lens to the crisis of mass incarceration can change this dynamic by raising awareness and promoting solutions to both curb incarceration and improve public health in poor communities. Pioneering data sharing across criminal justice and health care systems can break cycles of arrest and incarceration and change peoples’ lives. Work with public defenders can improve legal representation and outcomes for defendants who are mentally ill, and partnerships with officials who oversee jails can prevent suicide and other types of self-harm.

Related Work

Sharing Behavioral Health Information across Justice and Health Systems

Opportunities in the District of Columbia

People with mental health and substance use problems are overrepresented at all stages of the criminal justice system in the United States. However, decision makers, health care providers, and staff often work with only a fraction of the behavioral health information that exists about their clients. Expanding the availability of behavioral health d...

Publication
  • Marilyn Sinkewicz, Yu-Fen Chiu, Leah Pope
December 07, 2018
Publication

Impact of Having an Incarcerated Parent Lasts a Lifetime—and May Shorten It, Study Says

A recent study of the impact of parental incarceration on children  in the Netherlands found that children of incarcerated parents were more likely to die prematurely in adulthood than people whose parents have not been incarcerated.    While previous studies have examined the impact of parental incarceration on younger children, little literature ...

Blog Post
  • Jack W. Duran
    Jack W. Duran
  • Karina Schroeder
    Karina Schroeder
January 23, 2018
Blog Post