Young Men of Color and the Other Side of Harm Addressing Disparities in Our Responses to Violence

Young Men of Color and the Other Side of Harm

Overview

Despite growing recognition of the disproportionate rates of young men of color caught up in the criminal justice system, little recognition is given to the fact that young men of color are also more likely to be the victims of crime and violence. This issue brief details the lack of support available to young men of color who experience trauma, as well as potential causes and consequences of this service gap. When we better understand the needs and experiences of these survivors, we are better positioned to provide them with the support they need and deserve.

Key Takeaway

Research indicates that young men of color are disproportionately the victims of crime and violence, but often do not get the help they need. Increased understanding of the causes and impacts of this disparity is needed in order to develop support to end it.

Publication Highlights

  • The media and society over-represent young men of color as aggressors or criminals, fueling a misperception that violence and pain impact young men of color less profoundly than others.

  • Few victim services exist for the kind of crimes young men of color are most likely to experience, such as robbery, or that account for their specific culture and experiences.

  • Due to cultural norms of masculinity and victimization, many young men of color do not identify as “victims,” even when describing experiences of being harmed. 

Key Facts

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