Rethinking Educational Neglect for Teenagers New strategies for New York State

Overview

Under New York State law, a parent or guardian who does not ensure that his or her child attends school regularly can be found to have neglected the child. From 2004 to 2008, educational neglect allegations increased by 34 percent statewide. Most of these allegations involved children ages 13 to 17. Concerned about this increase and the unique circumstances of teenagers who are not attending school regularly, the New York State Office of Children and Family Services, with support from Casey Family Programs, asked the Vera Institute of Justice to study New York State’s approach to educational neglect and to suggest strategies for improving the system’s response to cases involving teenagers.

Related

The Enhanced Pre-Arraignment Screening Unit

Improving Health Services, Medical Triage, and Diversion Opportunities in Manhattan Central Booking

New York City established Pre-Arraignment Medical Screening Units (PASUs) in all boroughs’ central booking facilities, except Staten Island, as a result of a 1993 legal settlement requiring the city to establish a process for screening the health needs of people who are arrested, booked into police custody, and awaiting arraignment. Unfortunately, ...

Publication
  • David Cloud, Leah Pope, Jim Parsons, Anne Siegler, Michelle Martelle
September 20, 2017
Publication

Closing the Distance

The Impact of Video Visits on Washington State Prisons

For people who are incarcerated, separation from family and friends is a difficult fact of life, as are the financial and logistical barriers that keep their loved ones from visiting them in prison. Because research has shown that contact with loved ones is a critical factor in improving outcomes for incarcerated people returning home, prison syste...

Publication
  • Léon Digard, Jessi LaChance, Jennifer Hill
August 15, 2017
Publication