Rethinking Educational Neglect for Teenagers New strategies for New York State

Overview

Under New York State law, a parent or guardian who does not ensure that his or her child attends school regularly can be found to have neglected the child. From 2004 to 2008, educational neglect allegations increased by 34 percent statewide. Most of these allegations involved children ages 13 to 17. Concerned about this increase and the unique circumstances of teenagers who are not attending school regularly, the New York State Office of Children and Family Services, with support from Casey Family Programs, asked the Vera Institute of Justice to study New York State’s approach to educational neglect and to suggest strategies for improving the system’s response to cases involving teenagers.

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Publication
  • Shaina Aber, Lauren Esterle, Derek Loh
June 16, 2021
Publication