Keeping Vulnerable Populations Safe under PREA Alternative Strategies to the Use of Segregation in Prisons and Jails

Keeping Vulnerable Populations Safe under PREA

Overview

Incarcerated people at risk for sexual victimization need to be housed safely without losing access to programming, mental and medical health services, and group activities. The National Standards to Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape emphasize that isolation be used to protect at-risk populations only when no other alternatives are available and all other options have been explored. To help agencies achieve compliance with these standards, Vera’s Center on Sentencing and Corrections, in conjunction with the National PREA Resource Center, has developed guidelines to provide prison and jail administrators and staff with promising strategies for safely housing inmates at risk of sexual abuse without isolating them. This guide includes approaches for managing the housing of populations at particularly high risk for sexual abuse in confinement: women; youthful inmates in adult facilities; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI) individuals; and people who are gender nonconforming.

Related

Vera’s Policing Program Releases Fourth Volume of “Emerging Issues in American Policing” Quarterly Digest

Emerging Issues in American Policing is a quarterly digest tailored to practitioners and community members interested in policing. It is designed to elevate new and innovative research on policing practices and strategies by providing readers with succinct summaries that highlight key findings and implementation recommendations. This digest equips ...

Blog Post
  • Rebecca Neusteter
    Rebecca Neusteter
  • Mawia Khogali
    Mawia Khogali
August 09, 2018
Blog Post

Fewer People are Going Back to Prison—But that Doesn’t Paint the Entire Picture

Judging a person’s reentry success based on recidivism highlights their failures, but what about their successes?

Fewer people are going back to prison, according to a new study from Pew Trusts.  The number of people sent back to state prison three years after being released dropped by nearly a quarter over a seven-year period. The study, which analyzed short-term and long-term recidivism rates, found that 48 percent of incarcerated people released in 2005 ret...

Blog Post
  • Jack W. Duran
    Jack W. Duran
  • Shawnda Chapman Brown
    Shawnda Chapman Brown
August 07, 2018
Blog Post