Ending Mass Incarceration

Reducing the Use of Jails

Conversations about mass incarceration tend to focus on prison, but local jails admit 20 times more people annually. The long-term trend is shocking: In 1982, for every 100 arrests, 51 people were booked into jail. By 2012, even after crime rates plummeted, that ratio had swelled to 95 out of 100, reflecting a knee-jerk use of jail out of step with threats to public safety. Today, jails log a staggering 12 million admissions a year—mostly poor people arrested for minor offenses who can’t post bail, and for whom even a few days behind bars exact a high toll.

It doesn’t have to be this way. Through the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Safety and Justice Challenge, our own office in New Orleans, and direct partnerships with jurisdictions nationwide, we’re helping officials use jails as they were intended: to protect communities from dangerous people. There’s no simple fix, so the work includes using alternatives to arrest and prosecution for minor offenses, recalibrating the use of bail, and addressing fines and fees that also trap people in jail.

Related Work

Gatekeepers

The Role of Police in Ending Mass Incarceration

Police in America arrest millions of people each year, and the likelihood that arrest will lead to jail incarceration has increased steadily. Ending mass incarceration and repairing its extensive collateral consequences thus must begin by focusing on the front end of the system: police work. Recognizing the roughly 18,000 police agencies around the...

Publication
  • Rebecca Neusteter, Ram Subramanian, Jennifer Trone, Mawia Khogali, Cindy Reed
August 12, 2019
Publication

The Public Wants Stories about Criminal Justice Reform

Taking stock of the open-source podcast 70 Million and its impact as season two launches

We learned so much from our first season. We learned that there's a demand for coverage of stories that focus on actionable ideas for local criminal justice reform. We learned that digital audio is an ideal medium for disseminating these necessary stories. Every smart phone comes preloaded with a podcast app, so accessing 70 Million only requires c...

Blog Post
  • Juleyka  Lantigua Williams
    Juleyka Lantigua Williams
July 15, 2019
Blog Post

Preventing Suicide and Self-Harm in Jail

A Sentinel Events Approach

Suicide is the leading cause of death in jails across the country. At a time when the public is paying closer attention to local jails and their primary role in mass incarceration, it is critical to shine light on the problem of jail suicide and the steps jails can take to prevent future deaths. This report is the second from Vera that frames suici...

Publication
  • Jason Tan de Bibiana, Therese Todd, Leah Pope
July 08, 2019
Publication

Series: Eliminating Money Injustice in New Orleans

Moving to Action on Ending Money Injustice

A conversation with activist and co-host of Pod Save the People Brittany Packnett

6. You’re emceeing a live music and panel discussion event in New Orleans on July 3—co-hosted by Vera, Global Citizen, and RFK Human Rights. Tell me what inspired you to get involved and what you’re looking forward to? I’m inspired by the work that Vera does to shine a light on the continued injustices in our system, and to make sure that these sto...

Blog Post
  • Vera Institute  of Justice
    Vera Institute of Justice
July 03, 2019
Blog Post

Series: Eliminating Money Injustice in New Orleans

How New Orleans Communities Rise Up Against Money Injustice

A conversation with New Orleans community organizer Gilda Lewis

5. How do you think New Orleans would change if Vera’s reforms were implemented? If they eliminated bail and conviction fees, it’s less stress. My community will be healthier, it’ll be safer, and people will have more rational decision-making. When you ask somebody for something that they don’t have... well, here we go again… we’re raising money. I...

Blog Post
  • Vera Institute  of Justice
    Vera Institute of Justice
June 28, 2019
Blog Post

Series: Eliminating Money Injustice in New Orleans

Confronting the True Harms of Money Injustice

A conversation with New Orleans community activist Roy Brumfield

5. How do you feel about this moment and the potential for reform? I’m angry, honestly. When I was in jail and I couldn’t pay my bond, I had to make a choice: what’s important right now? And I know that’s not unique about me. I’m not the only person who made that decision based upon the circumstances.

Blog Post
  • Vera Institute  of Justice
    Vera Institute of Justice
June 21, 2019
Blog Post

Series: Eliminating Money Injustice in New Orleans

New Orleans's Road Map to Eliminate Money Injustice

A conversation with Paid in Full co-author Alison Shih

7. We can’t wait! Any closing words? This work is pretty amazing, because not only does it have the potential to completely change the community that I live in right now, but as the rest of the nation is really gearing up and moving in this direction, it has the potential to influence other cities and states. Historically the issue of money injust...

Blog Post
  • Vera Institute  of Justice
    Vera Institute of Justice
June 13, 2019
Blog Post

Dignity, Racial Justice, and Prosecution

Embracing human dignity; Correcting racial injustice; Reimagining prosecution

As the gatekeepers of the justice system, prosecutors wield a tremendous amount of power and are uniquely situated to stem the tide of mass incarceration and to ensure justice and fairness. While a wave of reform-minded district attorneys across the country are bringing increased awareness on both the need and potential for reform, true progress ca...

Project
  • Jamila Hodge
    Jamila Hodge
Project