(Returning) Home for the Holidays

Returning Home For The Holidays Full
“All people deserve a fair chance at housing, no matter your sex, race, sexuality, gender, or conviction from your past.”
Kiana Calloway
Voice of the Experienced (VOTE); Panelist at New Orleans convening

As public attention grows to the difficulties people with criminal justice involvement face in securing housing, opportunities for reform emerge. We recently convened PHA representatives and local law enforcement partners from around the country in New Orleans to discuss how to move this work forward. And, Colorado’s Department of Local Affairs (DOLA) recently announced an initiative to help PHAs launch reentry programs.

Going forward, it’s critical that access to safe housing as part of a successful reentry process be included in discussions on criminal justice reform. At a time when people are busy celebrating the holidays and making new-year resolutions, we must remember the need for safe spaces in homes and communities for those coming home from prison and jails. And—given that more than 90 percent of people who are incarcerated will eventually return home—we must further recognize that our community’s success is inextricably tied to theirs.

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