Securing Equal JusticeReaching All Victims

Young Men of Color

Young men of color living in racially segregated, low-income communities are far more likely than any other group in America to be victims or perpetrators of violence—or both at different points in time. Shocking levels of gun violence in some cities are just the crest of a problem that arrest, prosecution, and imprisonment has failed to stem.

Seeking to break cycles of violence, Vera created Common Justice, NYC’s and the nation’s first victim services and alternative-to-incarceration program for felony-level violent crimes. Rooted in the principals of restorative justice, Common Justice brings together harmed and responsible parties in a voluntary process that promotes healing and accountability and prevents future violence. From the lessons learned, Common Justice launched Healing Works in 2015, a national learning collaborative.

Related Work

Series: My Brother's Keeper

My Brother's Keeper: Integrating responses to victims and defendants

The recently released My Brother’s Keeper Task Force Report to the President includes a section on “reducing violence and providing a second chance,” which begins by saying, “On the path to adulthood, youth may fall victim to violence or experience an interaction with the criminal justice system that permanently alters their trajectory for the wors...

Blog Post
  • Danielle Sered
    Danielle Sered
July 02, 2014
Blog Post

Success of "My Brother's Keeper" will rely on removing racial disparities from our criminal justice system

Last month, President Obama introduced a new initiative, “My Brother’s Keeper,” which brings together government, business, philanthropy, the faith community, nonprofits, and others to work together to create more pathways to success for young men of color. The President spoke of current racial disparities and their historical roots, saying, “The p...

Blog Post
  • Danielle Sered
    Danielle Sered
March 14, 2014
Blog Post