Securing Equal JusticeBuilding Bridges Between Police and Communities

Policing and Immigrants

In the majority of U.S. states, the number of foreign-born residents increased by 30 percent or more over last decade, with many of these new arrivals settling in suburban areas once virtually untouched by immigration. Local police agencies are challenged to serve sometimes-vulnerable residents whose culture and language don’t match those of their line officers. Meeting obligations related to homeland security adds yet another layer of complexity.

To address these challenges, we pioneered the growing field of language access and led the way in building bridges between police and Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, and South Asian communities. We’ve also trained police in using the U-visa, a safety net for immigrant crime victims that cooperate with police, and published guidebooks written by police, for police in how to build trusting relationships with diverse communities.

Related Work

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After the 2016 presidential election, unusually large numbers of children and adults all over the United States have reacted by expressing hate, bigotry, and racism, contrary to our best principles of equality. Hate crime has been unleashed—with swastikas painted in playgrounds and schoolyards, attacks on Muslim school girls and cries of “build the...

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Series: Police Perspectives

New blog series explores importance of police/community trust

Across the country, people of all races and ethnicities are talking about police-community relations in the wake of high profile law enforcement encounters that resulted in the deaths of Eric Garner in Staten Island, Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Tamir Rice in Cleveland, as well as the murders of two New York City police officers in Broo...

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In Silence and in Fear

What “Baby Hope” Teaches Us About Immigrant Victims and Witnesses of Crime

Someone was empowered to speak up. In New York City, home to what many claim to be the most opinionated voices in the country, we often take for granted that people will talk—that they’ll share their stories, scream out during an emergency, and tell it like it is. But in the case of “Baby Hope,” it took two decades for someone, an anonymous tipster...

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