Securing Equal JusticeSupporting Immigrants

Policing and Immigrants

In the majority of U.S. states over last decade the number of foreign-born residents increased by 30 percent or more, with many of these new arrivals settling in suburban areas once virtually untouched by immigration. Local police agencies are challenged to serve sometimes-vulnerable residents whose culture and language don’t match that of their line officers. Meeting obligations related to homeland security adds yet another layer of complexity.

To address these challenges, we pioneered the growing field of language access and led the way in building bridges between police and Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, and South Asian communities. We’ve also trained police in using the U-visa, a safety net for immigrant crime victims that cooperate with police, and published guidebooks written by police for police in how to build trusting relationships with diverse communities.

Related Work

New York Immigrant Family Unity Project lays groundwork for constitutional victory

A recent decision by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit established that an immigrant is constitutionally entitled to a bond hearing within six months of being detained and must be released on bond unless the government provides compelling evidence that he or she is a flight risk or danger to the community. This important dec...

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  • Bettina Rodriguez  Schlegel
    Bettina Rodriguez Schlegel
December 28, 2015
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Engaging Police in Immigrant Communities

Promising Practices from the Field

Today, approximately 40 million foreign-born people live in the United States, seven million of whom arrived within the past eight years. Because very little is known about how most police agencies nationwide work with immigrant communities, in 2010, Vera’s Center on Immigration and Justice partnered with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of ...

Publication
  • Pradine Saint-Fort, Susan Shah, Noëlle Yasso
November 13, 2012
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The U.S. Department of Justice Issues National Standards to Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape

Last Thursday, nearly nine years after Congress passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA), the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) issued the first set of binding national standards to address sexual abuse in U.S. confinement settings. The promulgation of the standards coincides with the publication of an important new Bureau of Justice St...

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  • Allison Hastings
    Allison Hastings
May 21, 2012
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