Securing Equal Justice

Reaching All Victims

Supporting victims of crime is of course a critical component of the justice system. Our history of working to improve services for victims of crime started by developing Safe Horizon, one of the country’s flagship victim services providers, in 1975. One of the main challenges today is reaching victims that “mainstream” agencies aren’t helping because meeting their needs requires a broader set of skills. 

Who is part of this group?  There are alarmingly high rates of violence among people with disabilities and Deaf people. Several of our projects focus specifically on survivors of domestic and sexual violence that have had nowhere to turn for help, as well as hosting a national resource center to guide agencies on how to rigorously evaluate whether their services are meeting the needs of all survivors. Other underserved victim groups include LGBTQ people, incarcerated individuals, and young men of color. Work to support these people includes a nonprofit model of legal guardianship to protect older adults and other vulnerable people from abuse, and a project for young men of color who are victims and perpetrators of violence that promotes healing and accountability, to ultimately break cycles of violence.

Related Work

Accounting for Violence

How to Increase Safety and Break Our Failed Reliance on Mass Incarceration

In the United States, violence and mass incarceration are deeply entwined, though evidence shows that both can decrease at the same time. A new vision is needed to meaningfully address violence and reduce the use of incarceration—and to promote healing among crime survivors and improve public safety. This report describes four principles to guide p...

Publication
  • Danielle Sered
February 15, 2017
Publication

Lifting of Funding Restrictions Paves the Way for Incarcerated Survivors of Sexual Abuse to Access Victim Services

On December 31, 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) published a summary of changes to the rules governing how victim service agencies can use Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) assistance funds. The rule changes, which went into effect in August 2016, dramatically expand the ways states and territories can use funds to...

Blog Post
  • Allison Hastings
    Allison Hastings
January 13, 2017
Blog Post

Police and Communities Must Work Together to Support Victims of Hate Crimes

After the 2016 presidential election, unusually large numbers of children and adults all over the United States have reacted by expressing hate, bigotry, and racism, contrary to our best principles of equality. Hate crime has been unleashed—with swastikas painted in playgrounds and schoolyards, attacks on Muslim school girls and cries of “build the...

Blog Post
  • Laura Simich
    Laura Simich
  • Jacob  Kang-Brown
    Jacob Kang-Brown
December 20, 2016
Blog Post

Series: Gender and Justice in America

Mass incarceration and its impact are devastating to women

9to5, National Association of Working Women—of which I am the Georgia chapter director—understands the devastating impact mass incarceration has on women. The rate of growth for female imprisonment has outpaced men by more than 50 percent between 1980 and 2014. Now there are more than 1 million women behind bars or under some form of correctional...

Blog Post
  • Charmaine  Davis
    Charmaine Davis
August 15, 2016
Blog Post