Multimedia

03/28/2014

There are three times as many people with serious mental illness in U.S. jails and prisons than in state psychiatric hospitals—many of them incarcerated for low-level, nonviolent offenses that result from an untreated psychiatric condition. People with mental illness do not fare well in correctional facilities, where they are more likely to be victimized and housed in solitary confinement. Historically, justice systems have been ill-equipped to address the needs of this population due to a lack of adequate treatment services coupled with poor collaboration with community-based health organizations.

This briefing—with community and government leaders—examines how the Affordable Care Act and promising new initiatives may help abate this crisis. Watch the full briefing on YouTube.

03/20/2014

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, black, Hispanic and Asian residents of New York City and its suburbs are a majority of the metropolitan area’s population. The disproportionate impact on minorities of stop and frisk — ruled unconstitutional — has been the leading item on the justice agenda. But other justice issues related to immigrants and minorities merit attention, such as the intersection of AMEMSA (Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, South Asian) populations with the justice system in the post-9/11 era, the lack of representation for indigent immigrants facing detention, and wage theft. This panel discussion, which is part of Vera's Justice in Transition-NYC series, includes government and community leaders discussing these issues and what justice might look like in the de Blasio era.

Watch the the full panel discussion on YouTube.

03/10/2014

The mayoral transition in New York City provides an opportunity to reexamine the city's justice systems and ask if community needs that advance fairness and public safety are being met. This panel discussion explores the potential for initiatives embedded in communities where people have high rates of contact with the justice system—and how they aim to help residents succeed and communities thrive. The discussion, which features the New York City Department of Probation’s Neighborhood Opportunity Network Initiative (NeON), and the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) Family Re-entry Pilot, is part of Vera's Justice in Transition-NYC series.

Watch the full panel discussion on YouTube.

02/27/2014
Steve Rosenberg, president of Community Oriented Correctional Health Services (COCHS), talks with David Cloud of Vera's Substance Use and Mental Health program about the opportunities under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to improve access to healthcare services for criminal justice-involved populations, as a way to improve both public health and public safety. Rosenberg explains the unique role that corrections and court personnel can play in identifying eligible individuals, assisting them with the enrollment process, and linking them to care in the community. He also emphasizes the importance of health information technology in breaking down communication barriers between correctional health and community health systems, as a way to enhance care coordination.
02/03/2014

What will justice look like in the de Blasio era? Our Kids - Our Future is the first in a series of panel discussions convened by Vera to assess New York City's justice systems and proffer solutions for a new administration. This panel focuses on juvenile justice and the practices that can reduce young people’s contact with the system, while improving their life chances.

Panelists include Gladys Carrión, Commissioner, New York City Administration for Children’s Services; Vincent Schiraldi, Commissioner, New York City Department of Probation; Rukia Lumumba, Director of Youth Programs, CASES; and Hernan Carvente, Research Assistant, Vera Institute of Justice. The discussion is moderated by Kathleen Horan, Criminal Justice Reporter, WNYC.

Watch the full panel discussion on YouTube.


Learn more about Vera's Justice in Transition-NYC series.

10/17/2013

What is the impact of stop and frisk on young people in highly patrolled areas of New York City, and what does it mean for public safety? Find out in this video as lead authors, Jennifer Fratello and Andrés F. Rengifo, discuss the results of their study "Coming of Age with Stop and Frisk: Experiences, Self-Perceptions, and Public Safety Implications."

08/28/2013

Watch Ben Bryant, an economist with the Millennium Challenge Corporation, and Carl Matthies, a senior policy analyst at the Vera Institute of Justice, for a webinar about sensitivity analysis. This webinar is a fairly technical presentation that requires undergraduate-level knowledge of microeconomics, statistics, and probability. Viewers will gain a better understanding of how sensitivity analysis can be used, particularly in justice-related cost-benefit analyses.

08/28/2013

Tina Sanford, director of the New York State Office of Victim Services, Kathryn McCollister, assistant professor and health economist at the University of Miami School of Medicine, and Valerie Levshin, former policy analyst at the Vera Institute of Justice, provide an overview of victim costs, the methods used to estimate them, and how to use victim cost information in a cost-benefit analysis.

08/28/2013

Watch Elizabeth Drake, senior research associate at the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, and Valerie Levshin, a former policy analyst at the Vera Institute of Justice, discuss the role of evaluation in cost-benefit studies. Before starting a cost-benefit analysis of a criminal justice policy or program, you need to know: Does the initiative work? This training is designed for people interested in meta-analysis and/or conducting cost-benefit studies of criminal justice programs and policies.

08/14/2013

More than 700,000 people leave U.S. prisons each year, mostly returning to poor communities in urban areas. In this podcast, Bruce Western discusses early findings from his Boston Reentry Study that show prison precipitates a transition to severe poverty for a fragile population with often-traumatic histories of childhood exposure to violence.

Bruce Western is professor of sociology and director of the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Western's recent work has focused on the link between social inequality and the growth of prison and jail population in the United States.

This podcast is part of the Neil A. Weiner Research Speaker Series.

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