08/04/2015

Vera partnered with Fordham Law School’s Feerick Center for Social Justice to conduct a research study that explores the needs and experiences of New York City’s unaccompanied immigrant youth. The study, Struggle for Identity and Inclusion: Unaccompanied Immigrant Youth in New York City, draws upon the personal expertise of these youth and system stakeholders, in collaboration with researchers and community service providers.

In this video, peer researchers who immigrated to the United States alone as minors discuss their experiences recruiting and interviewing other unaccompanied immigrant youth as participants for the study. Abja Midha, project director of Advocates for Children, and Elvis Garcia Callejas, advisory committee member of Catholic Charities New York and himself a former unaccompanied youth, further discuss the importance of including youth as partners in the research.

To learn more, please visit www.vera.org/unaccompanied-youth-nyc.

 

05/04/2015

Attention is increasingly being paid to the disparities young men of color face in our society, including their disproportionate involvement in the criminal justice system as those responsible for crime. Little recognition, however, is given to the fact that young men of color are also disproportionately victims of crime and violence.

Vera convened a panel of experts to discuss the disparities in our response to violence, which included Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, Representative, Eight Congressional District of New York, and Kenneth Thompson, District Attorney, Brooklyn, Dr. Richard Dudley, Psychiatrist, New York City, and Rev. Dr. Harold Trulear, Professor of Applied Theology, Howard University School of Divinity. The panel was moderated by Kirsten Levingston, Program Officer, at the Ford Foundation.

For more information about addressing disparities in our response to violence, please download our issue brief.

07/10/2014

Vera partnered with the District Attorney of New York to examine whether prosecutorial discretion contributes to racially and ethnically disparate outcomes in New York County criminal cases. In this video, Vera Research Director Jim Parsons discusses Race and Prosecution in New York County and its findings. 
Learn more >

06/16/2014

Dr. Ingrid Binswanger, associate professor in Division of General and Internal Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, speaks with Vera’s director of research, Jim Parsons, about the disproportionately high risk of death among people reentering the community from jail or prison upon their release. Dr. Binswanger’s research signals the need for better collaboration and communication between health and justice systems to improve continuity in care.

This interview is part of Vera's Neil A. Weiner Research Speaker Series.

04/24/2014

Bryan Stevenson, founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, accepts the Vera Institute of Justice's Public Service Award during Vera's 8th Annual Benefit held on April 8, 2014. Stevenson remarked on Vera's work to meet the challenges created by mass incarceration.

04/23/2014

Jamie Fader, assistant professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University at Albany and author of Falling Back: Incarceration and Transitions to Adulthood among Urban Youth, discusses her research on incarcerated young men of color and the disjuncture between their aspirations at the point of release from a residential facility and the structural hurdles and realities they face upon returning home to family and community in an urban setting.

This interview is part of Vera's Neil A. Weiner Research Speaker Series.

03/28/2014

There are three times as many people with serious mental illness in U.S. jails and prisons than in state psychiatric hospitals—many of them incarcerated for low-level, nonviolent offenses that result from an untreated psychiatric condition. People with mental illness do not fare well in correctional facilities, where they are more likely to be victimized and housed in solitary confinement. Historically, justice systems have been ill-equipped to address the needs of this population due to a lack of adequate treatment services coupled with poor collaboration with community-based health organizations.

This briefing—with community and government leaders—examines how the Affordable Care Act and promising new initiatives may help abate this crisis. Watch the full briefing on YouTube.

03/20/2014

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, black, Hispanic and Asian residents of New York City and its suburbs are a majority of the metropolitan area’s population. The disproportionate impact on minorities of stop and frisk — ruled unconstitutional — has been the leading item on the justice agenda. But other justice issues related to immigrants and minorities merit attention, such as the intersection of AMEMSA (Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, South Asian) populations with the justice system in the post-9/11 era, the lack of representation for indigent immigrants facing detention, and wage theft. This panel discussion, which is part of Vera's Justice in Transition-NYC series, includes government and community leaders discussing these issues and what justice might look like in the de Blasio era.

Watch the the full panel discussion on YouTube.

03/10/2014

The mayoral transition in New York City provides an opportunity to reexamine the city's justice systems and ask if community needs that advance fairness and public safety are being met. This panel discussion explores the potential for initiatives embedded in communities where people have high rates of contact with the justice system—and how they aim to help residents succeed and communities thrive. The discussion, which features the New York City Department of Probation’s Neighborhood Opportunity Network Initiative (NeON), and the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) Family Re-entry Pilot, is part of Vera's Justice in Transition-NYC series.

Watch the full panel discussion on YouTube.

02/27/2014
Steve Rosenberg, president of Community Oriented Correctional Health Services (COCHS), talks with David Cloud of Vera's Substance Use and Mental Health program about the opportunities under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to improve access to healthcare services for criminal justice-involved populations, as a way to improve both public health and public safety. Rosenberg explains the unique role that corrections and court personnel can play in identifying eligible individuals, assisting them with the enrollment process, and linking them to care in the community. He also emphasizes the importance of health information technology in breaking down communication barriers between correctional health and community health systems, as a way to enhance care coordination.

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