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Apr 29, 2016 This is the first blog post in a series about bail reform in New York City.  New York’s bail system is broken. The system is one epic bail fail. Bail reform is needed now. These are some of the phrases and headlines splashed across New York City newspapers in the past year. From the New York Times to the New York Post, the City’s media is abuzz with talk of bail. A couple of high-profile cases have punctuated these declarations. Kalief Browder, a Bronx...
Apr 4, 2016 */ The Unlocking Potential: Perspectives on Education in Prison blog series—as part of Vera’s Pathways from Prison to Postsecondary Education Project—explores postsecondary education in prison and its benefits—during and after incarceration—through the unique experiences and insight of former students, educators, nonprofit leaders, corrections...
Mar 30, 2016 Think about a particularly trying time in your life. Now think about not having a place to stay or family to support you during this time of hardship. Would you have made it?  For people recently convicted of a crime, having a place to stay and the support of family are often the most influential factors in their success. But for decades, housing authorities across the country have not allowed recently convicted people to access public housing, even...
Feb 29, 2016 Last week, Vera, in partnership with the Georgetown University McCourt School of Public Policy, hosted a lively discussion about the importance of family engagement for youth involved in the juvenile justice system and launched a new report, Identifying, Engaging, and Empowering Families: A Charge for Juvenile Justice Agencies. Shay Bilchik, founder and director of the...
Feb 24, 2016 Last fall, the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, with support from the Jacob and Valeria Langeloth Foundation, convened a colloquium including 15 corrections agency heads and a like number of experts from the community of those seeking to reform the use of social isolation, often called “solitary confinement,” in U.S. prisons and jails. The purpose: to determine if consensus on sought-after reforms might be achieved by common agreement and without...

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