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Feb 8, 2016 It’s raining today in the District of Columbia. It’s the kind of light, misty rain that persistently dusts coats and umbrellas. It’s the kind of rain that brings with it a slight chill, but pleasant freshness into the air. For most of us, the rain ends when we make our way into homes, office buildings, restaurants, and various other places of shelter throughout the city. But for some of us, there is no relief—the rain is a dampening reminder of reality....
Jan 4, 2016 A new study—co-authored by the University of Massachusetts Medical School, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control—confirms what past research and anecdotal evidence in the field of abuse of people with disabilities have long suggested: men with disabilities...
Dec 14, 2015 Last year, I outed myself as an inveterate Bravophile[1] when I pointed out the interesting—if accidental—work that The Real Housewives of New Jersey did to illuminate what it’s like to wait for incarceration to begin. What I didn’t expect (and probably should have)...
Nov 23, 2015 In the days since the November 13th terrorist attacks in Paris, several anti-Muslim acts of violence have been reported across the United States and worldwide. If history is a reliable witness, these hate crimes—criminal acts motivated in whole or in part by bias against a person’s real or perceived race/ethnicity, religion, sexual...
Nov 17, 2015 Last month, the New York Times reported that more than 130 law enforcement officials have launched an initiative to reduce both crime and incarceration, representing a public shift in philosophy from previously popular tough-on-crime rhetoric. As a police officer in Seattle for 31 years and now with the King County Sheriff’s Office for the last year...
Oct 23, 2015 Too often, educating incarcerated people with disabilities about their rights, access to services, and agency policies is limited to reading aloud to people who are blind or low-vision and giving print materials to Deaf people. These makeshift accommodations, while understandable in a busy correctional facility that places high demands on staff, provide only the most basic access to information for only a portion of those who have diverse and easily...

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